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Day 4

inktober04

I was short of time on Day 4, so I did a tiny Geralt of Rivia fanart (dude from the Witcher III game). Even though it’s very small, it still took considerable time to prep and put together, which is why I doubt I’ll make it to 31.

My mother trained in portraiture, and she was very good at it. I would love to have followed, but I cannot capture a likeness to save my immortal soul.

That’s a whole separate skill, quite apart from painting ability. I have a friend who is a not very good painter, but you look at her paintings and know who you’re looking at. Me, the most common reaction to my portraits is, “that’s a lovely picture of somebody, but it sure ain’t me.”

Here I demonstrate that I cannot reproduce an accurate likeness of a comic character with white hair, yellow slitty cat eyes and a huge scar. That’s just how good I am.

See you back here tomorrow for Dead Pool Round 103!

Comments


Comment from Durnedyankee
Time: October 5, 2017, 7:51 pm

Oh, I don’t know – from what I see of the on-line images, I think he’d be quite complimented by your rendering.

Maybe if you went back and made him look less like he’s posing for his portrait, and more like he’s about to send someone’s head sailing into next Tuesday you’d feel better about your abilities :)
Remember you’re probably talking to a lot of people who find stick figures to be a challenge.

Then, there’s this – Not your dad’s Geralt (or maybe it is…)
http://www.funnyjunk.com/Geralt+of+rivia+with+tits/funny-pictures/5536048/

 


Comment from QuasiModo
Time: October 5, 2017, 11:07 pm

Kneel before Zod! :+)

 


Comment from Uncle Al
Time: October 5, 2017, 11:57 pm

…but I cannot capture a likeness to save my immortal soul.

But you do very well capturing the likeness of animals. I’m sure I could identify which cat you had drawn from among a group of similarly marked cats. I find your art most appealing, Stoatie.

 


Comment from xul’s fedora
Time: October 6, 2017, 12:56 am

I never had formal training, but back in the day when I still liked to draw I was quite good at portraits–they looked like they could come to life and have a conversation with you. Of course my parents didn’t see that as a marketable skill. :rolls eyes:

“I would love to have followed, but I cannot capture a likeness to save my immortal soul.”

I don’t know about that, Stoatie. That watercolor you did of Yogi Berra for my dick pic was quite good. :)

 


Comment from Deborah HH
Time: October 6, 2017, 1:23 am

Don’t know the character, so must take your word that the likeness is not right, but it’s still a good drawing.

 


Comment from tomfrompv
Time: October 6, 2017, 3:11 am

Heres a thought. Draw the face as best you can, then plug it into google photo search and see who it really looks like. Dox that person to get his/her address and offer to sell them the portrait! I’d bet you get a ton of takers.

 


Comment from catnip
Time: October 6, 2017, 3:54 am

Geralt of Rivia is an unknown, but the man in your drawing definitely has the look of someone’s hero.

Artists have strengths and weaknesses, and to gain commercial success, most specialize in use of their strongest skills. John Atkinson Grimshaw achieved fame and solvency by portraying, as no one else could, familiar landscapes lit by the moon, or gaslight. You, among other skills, have a flair for endowing animals with energy and attitude through the delicate detail of your drawings. ‘Fess up–you’re a remarkably gifted lady. We’re lucky to have so many opportunities to enjoy (and pinch) these exceptional drawings of yours. I’ve nabbed both Charlotte and the piglet for screen saver/warm fuzzies. Thank you, Stoaty!

 


Comment from Durnedyankee
Time: October 6, 2017, 9:42 am

Have you really looked at some of the professionally done portraits of people who had the power to have you tossed into a dungeon?
You’d have been safe from dungeon tossing,. As for those artists, I only hope their subjects didn’t really look like that, but I can’t imagine why they were ever paid for their work.

 


Comment from Uncle Badger
Time: October 6, 2017, 10:55 am

Thank you catnip – how nice to find another Grimshaw admirer! Her Stoatliness and I are both great admirers of his. We saw several of his paintings at the Royal Academy in London, years ago when they showed Andrew Lloyd-Webber’s collection of Victorian art. He may be a rotten composer but he has fine taste in art and the Grimshaws were outstanding.

 


Comment from Ric Fan
Time: October 6, 2017, 4:29 pm

With the police seeking to prosecute child abuse crimes decades after the alleged perpetrator has died, how come they havent gone after the perviest of the pervs, Eric Gill?

 


Comment from Wolfus Aurelius
Time: October 6, 2017, 5:27 pm

Geralt of Rivia . . .? At first I thought you were talking about Geraldo Rivera!

I don’t know the character, either, but he comes across as a forceful sort of presence. Good work.

 


Comment from catnip
Time: October 7, 2017, 5:13 am

@Uncle Badger
You’re welcome; she’s a treasure. Fortunately, most of Grimshaw’s paintings are still available as prints, but I’d give my left hind leg for the chance to examine any one of his originals. Wonderful reflections on rain-washed cobblestones…how did he do that? And the vertical elements, trees, masts, buildings–sublime! I’m so glad you and Stoaty were able to view some of the paintings at close range.

 


Comment from S. Weasel
Time: October 7, 2017, 8:04 pm

Catnip, when we got back from the show, we immediately ordered a book of Grimshaw reproductions. It was awful; he really does not reproduce in print well at all. The magic just was not there.

Obviously, his famous night scenes were well represented, but his range was astonishing. I remember one painting of a woman in a highly decorated room – the light on the paneling and mother of pearl bits. Just extraordinary.

 


Comment from S. Weasel
Time: October 7, 2017, 8:07 pm

Might be this one, though I remembered it slightly differently.

And thanks for the compliments, folks. I’m not fishing for ’em, I swear.

 


Comment from Uncle Badger
Time: October 7, 2017, 8:50 pm

Sadly, that link proves the point – his work really doesn’t reproduce well. I wonder why?

 


Comment from catnip
Time: October 8, 2017, 6:36 am

Grimshaw’s studies of ladies in the home are jaw-droppers, but If he’d lived to paint Dulce Domus today, the opulence would probably kickstart the revolution. It’s odd that his paintings don’t photograph decently.

Sometime in the past my mother either mailed away boxtops with a couple of dollars for premium offers of artwork, or subscribed to some sort of art-of-the-month club. She left us a box of sheaves of 4 to 6 prints of paintings by well known artists on nicely textured paper stock. As we divided her estate, I remember noting a batch of Georgia O’Keefes apparently not to my mother’s taste. One from that grab bag of prints may have been the framed repro of Shipping on the Clyde that hung in the living room when my sister and I were small. It struck me as beautiful at that age, but I don’t know how faithfully it represented the original, nor where it went.

 


Comment from BJM
Time: October 9, 2017, 3:15 am

*Raising hand*

I know who the sketch looks like…it took several viewings.

Ta Da!

 


Comment from Sigivald
Time: October 9, 2017, 9:08 pm

I dunno, looks like Geralt to me.

 

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