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Speak to me, Ozymandias!

pharoah

Another one to file in the “cool things you will never, ever find in your back yard” file. They drained some standing water in a Cairo slum and found this. They found most of the rest of it, too. They think it’s Ramses II (the Big Guy), and there’s probably more where that came from in that particular small and trash-strewn corner of the city.

You’ve probably seen this one, too — it’s all over the news tonight. But, hey — I’ve been upstairs painting chickens this evening.

By which I don’t mean applying coloring agents to Mapp. I mean painting teeny, weeny, tiny chook portraits. Rendering minute burbly wattles is fun! I’m’a spend my whole weekend doing it.

Hope your weekend is just as awesome!

Comments


Comment from Ric Fan
Time: March 10, 2017, 10:52 pm

Your studio is in your attic?? How bohemian! :)

I saw where some one did a map of their backyard with tiny portraits of their many cats, alive and dearly departed, on the edge. Each portrait had the name and personal attributes of the kitty. Bushes and trees were labeled as ‘Boots favorite sunning spot’ or ‘Lilac Bush where Fluffy liked to hide’… It was very charming.

 


Comment from Feynmangroupie
Time: March 11, 2017, 12:47 am

Yes, let’s dig out the priceless artifact with a frelling bulldozer. Oh, well Daesh will likely destroy it anyways. Damn, I’m mean and bitter these days.

 


Comment from Some Vegetable
Time: March 11, 2017, 4:19 am

Feynman Groupie – Egypt is full of stuff like this. The only reason this particular one is being “hailed as ‘one of the most important discoveries ever'” is explained later in the article:

“The find could be a boon for Egypt’s tourism industry, which has suffered many setbacks since the uprising that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak in 2011 but remains a vital source of foreign currency. The number of tourists visiting Egypt slumped to 9.8 million in 2011 from more than 14.7 million in 2010.

 


Comment from Bob B
Time: March 11, 2017, 6:27 am

The statue fragment reminds me of the story of Ozymandias. Maybe it IS the story of Ozymandias. From Wikipedia:
In antiquity, Ozymandias (Ὀσυμανδύας) was a Greek name for the Egyptian pharaoh Ramesses II. Shelley began writing his poem in 1817, soon after the announcement of the British Museum’s acquisition of a large fragment of a statue of Ramesses II from the thirteenth century BC, leading some scholars to believe that Shelley was inspired by this. The 7.25-ton fragment of the statue’s head and torso had been removed in 1816 from the mortuary temple of Ramesses at Thebes by Italian adventurer Giovanni Battista Belzoni. It was expected to arrive in London in 1818, but did not arrive until 1821.[5][6] Shelley wrote the poem in friendly competition with his friend and fellow poet Horace Smith (1779–1849), who also wrote a sonnet on the same topic with the very same title. Smith’s poem was published in The Examiner a few weeks after Shelley’s sonnet. Both poems explore the fate of history and the ravages of time: that all prominent figures and the empires that they build are impermanent and their legacies fated to decay into oblivion.

Here’s one of the two poems
I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed:

And on the pedestal these words appear:
‘My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!’
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.

 


Comment from durnedyankee
Time: March 11, 2017, 2:07 pm

Who knew ISIS was operating back in Shelley’s day.

Think of it as making room for the new ruins we’ll create when we finally get serious.

 


Comment from geoff
Time: March 11, 2017, 8:28 pm

Hey SWeasel: Lipstick passed away on Tuesday.

 


Comment from ExpressoBold
Time: March 11, 2017, 10:10 pm

Comment from geoff
Time: March 11, 2017, 8:28 pm
Hey SWeasel: Lipstick passed away on Tuesday.

~
Wut?

 


Comment from EZnSF
Time: March 12, 2017, 6:27 am

Never trust a pregnant Egyptian man in an 18th century dress.

 


Comment from Niña
Time: March 12, 2017, 9:40 am

I hope we get to see the chook paintings once you’ve swept all the awards with them!

 


Comment from peacelovewoodstock
Time: March 12, 2017, 1:37 pm

Off topic – Chicken Attack!

Yodeling and chicken ninjas!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=miomuSGoPzI

 


Comment from Pupster
Time: March 12, 2017, 1:51 pm

http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/W/bo15996959.html

Check your local library, Badger.

 


Comment from Deborah HH
Time: March 13, 2017, 11:23 am

Don’t you know the antiquities authorities were both horrified and thrilled by this find. I bet they posted a platoon of guards on this baby so it couldn’t be stolen before it was carted up and removed.

 


Comment from Deborah HH
Time: March 13, 2017, 11:40 am

But wait! There’s more to be found down this literary bunny trail: a book about the Benson family, one of whom wrote Stoaty’s favorite books (the Lucia novels).

http://pressblog.uchicago.edu/2017/03/08/a-very-queer-family-indeed-at-the-atlantic.html

 

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